How are there so many varieties of marijuana?

This is due to the different types of marijuana available on the market. Different stoners use different types of weed varieties.

How are there so many varieties of marijuana?

This is due to the different types of marijuana available on the market. Different stoners use different types of weed varieties. The differences are also due to the genetic makeup of existing cannabis species. Each of them has terpene and cannabinoid compounds that define all the differences.

Many growers cross cannabis plants to develop new strains with specific characteristics. Experts suggest that there are more than 700 varieties of cannabis. The short answer is yes, but scientifically, we don't know how, or why, or even if sativas and indicas exist in pure form. Cannabis strains are pure or hybrid varieties of the plant genus Cannabis, which encompasses species C.

The two most commonly cultivated species of the Cannabis genus are Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa. A third species, Cannabis ruderalis, is very short and produces only traces of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), so it is not commonly cultivated for industrial, recreational or medicinal use. However, because Cannabis ruderalis blooms regardless of photoperiod and age, it has been used to breed autoflowering strains. In addition to pure indica, sativa and ruderalis varieties, hybrid varieties with varying proportions of these three types are common, such as the White Widow hybrid, which has approximately 60% indica and 40% sativa ancestry.

These hybrid varieties exhibit traits of both parent types. There are also commercial cross-hybrids that contain a mixture of ruderalis, indica or sativa genes, and are generally autoflowering varieties. These strains are mainly bred for the medical cannabis market, as they are not highly appreciated by recreational cannabis users because ruderalis varieties have a lower THC content and impart a slightly unpleasant taste. Lowryder was an early autoflowering hybrid that maintained the flowering behavior of ruderalis plants, while producing appreciable amounts of THC and CBD.

Autoflowering cannabis strains have the advantage of being discreet due to their small stature. They also require shorter growth periods, as well as having the added advantage that they don't rely on a change in photoperiod to determine when to flower. According to Myles, it is better to think that the herb exists on a spectrum of sativa and indica, and the most accurate way to describe the herb is its THC and CBD content rather than its genetic heritage. This may be because, when it comes to the genetic differences between a strain of herb that is supposedly 30 percent indica and 70 percent sativa, or vice versa, science has already strongly suggested that it's a big lie.